The Space to Write

The Space to Write .JPG

The space I write is very important to me. It often includes some natural element, such as wood as you can see in the picture. The smell of fresh pine immediately brings images of tall pine trees towering over me as I walk deeper into the forest, searching for a quite haven to reflect upon the day’s events.

However, I also find myself writing energetically in the waiting room of a doctor’s surgery. Curious eyes looking on, remarking silently to neighbours in the waiting room, “What is that young man writing? Is he a famous writer?” (I dream on.)

I take moments out of my busy day and compile my thoughts, writing up observations of the students I have taught and the common errors they make, some of which are most intriguing and worthy of gathering them into a considerably sized novel.

The content of my writing often comes from my surroundings. I will regularly sit patiently in a busy park, watching people pass by. Sitting in a cafe in the central piazza, or square, will cause me to practically finish a notebook in a day. Passing by the window, as I sip my empty cup of espresso coffee in attempt to eke out my stay in the cafe, I see all walks of life.

Sometimes the strangest coincidences will occur which cause me to write. It was only this morning that I opened the English course book to present the lesson to my student when I noticed the reading exercise. It was about four authors who had been interviewed on where they wrote and when they exercised their inspiration. Coincidence or fate, you decide. I find that rather uncanny, personally.

 

Thanks for Reading.

If you would like to learn how to write like this in English, I can help you. Just click here.

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